Pet Safety Guide-CNET – CNET

Soju prepares for his next dangerous adventure.

Macy Meyer / CNET

I adopted my cat, Soju, during the pandemic – and I’ve already started to worry about leaving her as I return to the office. It’s understandable: we’ve spent almost 24 hours a day together for over a year.

People have adopted a record number of pets since the start of the pandemic, and as pandemic restrictions begin to ease across the country, new pet owners leave their furry family members at home for most of the day for what is likely the first time. This transition will certainly be An adjustment for the pet and the parent, and care about the welfare of your dogs or cats is natural. With these handy tips and safety precautions, we can all return to our favorite locations with confidence.

Common household risks

From foods that can make your pet sick to dangerous plants, your home is full of potential dangers. Following these safety checklists will make every room safe and secure.

Food:

  • Keep cleaners, chemicals, and detergents on tall shelves or in cabinets locked with a child lock.
  • Do not let weight cookware or sharp utensils on the counter to prevent it from falling on your pet or cutting its paw.
  • Keep all foods closed and away. While most human foods are perfectly safe for pets, chocolate, avocado, tomatoes, and other tasty snacks can be harmful to your dog or cat. Pack food after eating and consider keeping your produce in a cabinet.
  • Keep garbage cans locked or secure in a cabinet. We’ve all seen the movies (watching you, Marley and me) when the dog goes wild in the trash. And while this creates an entertaining movie scene, it can be a nightmare to clean up in reality.

Read more: Here’s how much it costs to own a dog or cat in 2021

Living room and bedroom:

  • Keep all the wires that hang from the lamps, televisions, stereos and telephones out of reach. To put portable and phone charging cords in a drawer. Cats especially have the gift of turning any household item into their new favorite toy.
  • Store children’s toys and other small items. Again, your pet will likely lose interest in the toys you actually bought for them at the store to opt for your jewelry and socks (and whatever else they decide to be theirs), so be careful what you do. let around you. avoid damage or risk of suffocation.
  • To relocate plants and flowers out of reach. While houseplants can add a bit of greenery and color to a room, they can be toxic to your cat or dog if eaten. Make sure to look for flora that is safe for animals like spider plants and orchids to prevent your pet from eating poisonous plants.
  • Lock the doors of your washing machine and dryer.
  • Make sure all heating or air vents have secure covers.
  • Make sure you don’t close your pet – especially notoriously elusive cats – inside closets or cupboards. I know it might sound unlikely, but I’ve already spent almost an hour running around my 800 square foot apartment trying to find my cat … only to find her napping in one of the rooms. my kitchen cabinets.

Read more: The best pet insurance for 2021

Bathroom:

  • Keep the toilet lid closed to prevent your pet from unwanted drinking or diving into the basin.
  • Store medications, cleaning supplies, cosmetics, and other items in a drawer or cabinet that cannot be easily opened.
  • Keep all rubber bands and bobby pins in place. While your cat loves to play with a spare tie (I know mine does) and it’s always hard to spoil the fun when you end up removing the new toy, the vet fee will be even less fun if your animal swallows something it shouldn’t. t.

While many of these dangers may seem relatively low risk, it never hurts to be proactive and vigilant, especially when it comes to your companion.

The bottom line

Nothing reassures pet owners more than knowing their pet is safe and happy, regardless of the distance. These home safety tips and measures specially designed for your dog or cat will help them stay healthy and help you feel safe enough to go back to work with confidence. Whether you are already returning to work or just prepping ahead of time, your pet will undoubtedly appreciate these safety precautions. And remember, every time you go and wherever you go, you will miss your pet too.

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Susan W. Lloyd

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